Stephen Zunes : U.S. Foreign Policy (Historical)


Remembering Martin Luther King, the Radical for Peace
3 April 2018

It is nothing short of tragic that the fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4 arrives during a presidential administration containing some of the most overtly racist individuals to hold positions of such political power in generations.


Public Intellectuals and Activists Weigh In on the Tet Offensive 50 Years Later
31 January 2018

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Tet Offensive. On January 30, 1968, thousands of North Vietnamese soldiers and their Viet Cong support organized a sweeping attack of multiple cities in South Vietnam. The event is said to have reinforced the United States opposition to the Vietnam War. The following is a compilation of […]


New Lebanese president’s career highlights US inconsistencies
28 November 2016

There are more than a few ironies regarding the Oct. 31 election by the Lebanese parliament of former Gen. Michel Aoun, a Maronite Catholic who received his military training in the United States, as the country’s new president. One of the most striking is his shifting allegiances and the inconsistencies of U.S. policy toward Lebanon.


Pick Your Poison: Clinton Vs. Trump on Foreign Policy
14 June 2016

In their remarks to the nation following the Orlando massacre, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump made their differences—and disturbing similarities—crystal clear.


The U.S. and the Rise of ISIS
10 December 2015

The rise of ISIS (also known as Daesh, ISIL, or the “Islamic State”) is a direct consequence of the U.S. invasion and occupation of Iraq. While there are a number of other contributing factors as well, that fateful decision is paramount….


Straight Talk on the U.S. and Ukraine
13 March 2014

Given the limits of its power and its own compromised relationship with international law, the U.S. isn’t in a position to do much about Ukraine.


US Invasion of Grenada: A 30-Year Retrospective
25 October 2013

On this anniversary, it would be worth looking back at the Grenadian revolution, the U.S. invasion, its aftermath and the important precedent it set for “regime change” through U.S. military intervention.


The Nobel Committee’s Rebuke to Washington’s Unilateralism
11 October 2013

The awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), one of the most effective instruments for international arms control, sends an important message to those who have insisted that unilateral military action is the best means to eliminate and prevent the use of these deadly agents.


The US Has No Credibility Dealing With Chemical Weapons
9 September 2013

This is an updated and expanded version of the article “The US and Chemical Weapons: No Leg to Stand On,” originally posted in Foreign Policy in Focus on May 2, 2013.


US government hypocrisy undercuts demand for Snowden’s extradition
29 August 2013

Dr. Stephen Zunes’ article in the National Catholic Reporter on the extradition of Edward Snowden